Services

Eulogies & Obituaries

Eulogies

Writing a eulogy is different than writing an obituary. Obituaries are generally only a paragraph or two, while a eulogy is a written speech that is delivered at the funeral service. In the days following the death of a loved one, you may find yourself having to write both. Here are some helpful tips that will make writing a eulogy a little easier.

Keep your eulogy brief

Having a speech that is short will make it less likely for you to start rambling or get emotional while talking about your loved one.

Make the eulogy personal

Don’t regurgitate the information found in the obituary and recite a list of facts about your loved one. A eulogy is the time to share a story about them that illustrates something they enjoyed doing and explains the type of person they were. Important information to include are major events in the deceased’s life, their relationship with family and friends, achievements or things they cared most about.

Keep the eulogy positive

Family and friends are already struggling with grief from losing their loved one so the eulogy isn’t the time to bring up negative thoughts and feelings. Everyone can find the words to say that focus on the positives in life.

Use a conversational tone

Most people don’t have trouble talking with their family and friends. When delivering a eulogy, speak with a conversational tone to make the story more interesting for the listeners. While speaking, make sure you look up and make eye contact with the audience.

How to Write an Obituary

There are many decisions that a family has to make following the death of a loved one. The tasks can often be very overwhelming and challenging for many. One of those many details that has to be attended to is the writing of the obituary. If you have recently lost a loved one and you don’t know where to start, here are some tips to guide you in the process.

Include personal information

There are many decisions that a family has to make following the death of a loved one. The tasks can often be very overwhelming and challenging for many. One of those many details that has to be attended to is the writing of the obituary. If you have recently lost a loved one and you don’t know where to start, here are some tips to guide you in the process.

All of this information doesn’t have to be included, but is a good beginning to writing a complete obituary.

  • Name

  • Date of death

  • Age of deceased

  • Location of death

  • Birthdate

  • Parents’ names

  • Education

  • Marriage/children information

  • Accomplishments

  • Work history

General overview of the family

Every family member doesn’t have to be listed by name, but you may want to include, both deceased and living, the names of:

  • Parents

  • Spouses

  • Children

  • Siblings

  • Grandparents

  • Grandchildren

  • Nieces

  • Nephews

  • Special friends, caretakers

Specific details about the funera

  • Date

  • Time

  • Location

  • Officiant

  • Donations

  • Flowers

  • Condolences

Sample obituary

Jane Doe, 74, of Wakefield, died Monday, February 4, 2021 after a courageous battle with cancer.
Jane was born on July 31, 1943 in Houston, TX to Joe and Sally Smith. She received her doctorate in special education from the University of Utah in Salt Lake City in 1971, and worked with children with learning disabilities for over 30 years. On May 28, 1975, she married Steve Doe and together they raised three children, Nick, Joel and Alice.
Jane was preceded in death by her parents, Joe and Sally Smith. She is survived by her husband, Steve, her three children, Nick, Joel and Alice, her five grandchildren, Abby, Bentley, Caleb, Daniel and Elizabeth, one sister, Suzi and one brother, Joe, several aunts, uncles, cousins, nieces and nephews.
Funeral services will be held on Thursday, February 7, 2021 at the Church of Christ at 123 Main Street at 1 o’clock p.m.
Flowers and donations should be sent to 234 West St., Houston, TX.